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A nice metaphor for object orientation and service orientation

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I was recently watching an awesome webcast by Scott Hanselman on the topic of OData. Even if you are familiar with OData, I would recommend that webcast. The way he explains the position of REST and WS* is very balanced and educative. No dogmatic rants on how “rubbish” WS* is and how waay-cool (not) REST is. Anyway, more about the subject of that webcast in another post but what I wanted to highlight was this cool metaphor that Scott used when talking about OO and SO.

To paraphrase his illustration, “In the old days in the 90s we would model, say, a book as a “Book” object and that book object would have a “Checkout()” method and we would call “book.Checkout()” and we would sit back feeling satisfied with the “real world” approach. But then service orientation made us realize that there really is a Librarian Service and a Checkout Request and you submit the Checkout Request to the Librarian Service and it would go off and do that work asynchronously and you would “hang out” in the library and when it was ready it would call you back and give you the Book Checkout Response. This turns out to be a better metaphor for how life works. 

 IMO, this is a great explanation for the difference in approaches to system design. It’s still quite possible for these two to co-exist in scenarios where we design the “macro” system with SO and the internal components follow nice “OO” composition and/or hierarchies. The really cool part of SO is that it takes the “encapsulation” level much higher up. Consumers think in more coarse grained terms of message exchange patterns and about service levels rather than about methods on individual objects.

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Written by santoshbenjamin

September 5, 2010 at 3:39 PM

Posted in Coding, General, System Design

Tagged with ,

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  1. […] Testing ← A nice metaphor for object orientation and service orientation […]


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